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Egypt

This tag is associated with 35 posts

Can an election boycott in Egypt work? A few thoughts


The answer is NO and here’s why. Last year, calls for an election boycott were louder and it still had little effect. This year the calls are hesitant, and weak. In another article, I discuss the historical lack of effectiveness and the dangers of election boycotts in general (Egypt, how effective are election boycotts?). Here I … Continue reading

Egypt, how effective are election boycotts?


Please also refer to this related article: Can an election boycott in Egypt work? A few thoughts  November 28, 2010 was the date that marked the most fraudulent election polls in Egypt’s history. And exactly one year later, Egypt’s first post-revolution elections will take place. This should be cause for jubilation; sadly however, many of the … Continue reading

Essam Atta – swallowing detergent is standard prison procedure in Egypt


Since the publication of my article “Essam Atta alleged torture method known as water cure“, another theory has emerged that suggests that the victim was forced to swallow large quantities of water mixed with a laundry detergent. This account was conveyed by Ineam Atta, the subject’s mother. Ineam recounted how another prisoner told her that her son had … Continue reading

Essam Atta autopsy – Conflicts in the eyewitness doctor report


I rarely get to blog about medicine here but I just want to highlight a few conflicts between the official reports on the cause of death for the alleged torture victim, Esaam Atta, and the account of an eyewitness to the autopsy, Dr. Ahmed Seyam, who is affiliated to a group named “Tahrir Doctors”. Dr. … Continue reading

Religious slogans between freedom of expression and social responsibility


As I write this article, news has surfaced that the Freedom and Justice Party (FJP), the Muslim Brotherhood’s political wing, will not use the Brotherhood’s famous motto “Islam is the Solution” in their political campaigns. Last week, the High Elections Commission issued a ban against the use of religious chants, symbols or slogans in the … Continue reading

Egypt’s first anti-discrimination law raises concerns


Egypt’s military rulers approved Egypt’s first explicit anti-discrimination law this Saturday. The announcement comes a week after clashes between Coptic protesters and the military resulted in the death of more than twenty Christian protesters. The amendment to Egypt’s Penal Code prohibits all forms of discrimination on the basis of gender, religion, language or ideology. Discrimination was … Continue reading

Michael Nabil’s father summoned to meet with head of Egypt’s military court


After Michael Nabil’s father went on air with Reem Maged of Arabic satellite TV channel ONTV with a letter to Marshall Tantawi head of the Egyptian Supreme Council of Armed Forces, Nabil’s father was summoned to meet with head of military court tomorrow. Previous requests over the past 5 months had been denied.

Michael Nabil’s release is essential for Egyptian democracy & rule of law


Dr. Michael Nabil Sanad, a 25 year old Egyptian veterinarian, has been sentenced to three years behind bars by a military tribunal. Today marks the 42nd day the blogger and pacifist has been on hunger strike for what his family says is the “ill-treatment” he has received at Al-Marg military prison, in Quliubia. Michael’s health … Continue reading

Egypt and Turkey, an Axis against Democracy?


The Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan began his highly publicized “Arab Spring” tour in Cairo this month as part of an effort to strengthen relations with the new government following the ousting of President Hosni Mubarak. Thousands of Egyptians rushed to greet the Turkish Prime Minister, chanting “Egypt, Turkey – one hand”. Although plans … Continue reading

How the Embassy Protests may Harm the Palestinian Cause


In a previous article “A New Egypt and Israel’s Border Distraction” published on the 4th of September, I argued that Egyptians should not fall prey to the growing anti-Israeli sentiment. I explained that while I believed the anger on the street was legitimate it threatens to derail the primary objectives of Tahrir, and that Egyptians … Continue reading